Getting a draw

It will be impossible to win all games and sometimes you will be pleased to get a draw out of a game. In chess a draw can sometimes be forced from seemingly hopeless positions.

 

A rather easy example is given in the following diagram.








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

It is White’s turn to move. I won’t give the right move here, but you are invited to add the solution to the comments.

Rook -> c1-c6

#2

We have seen other examples in our lessons in our example game about the opposition and in the lesson about the end of the game.

In the diagram below Black threatens checkmate by both 1…Qxf2# as well as 1…Re1#, but White can still get a draw.








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

First try to solve this exercise by yourself. The solution can be made visible by selecting the hidden text between the square brackets.

[ 1.Rxb6+ axb6 2.Qxb6+ Ka8
and now White gets a draw by the infinite check
3.Qa6+ Kb8 4.Qb6+ Ka8 5.Qa6+ Kb8 ]

The next example is rather difficult and the hidden text between the square brackets only contains some clues. Are you able to solve this one? Please note that it is Black’s turn to move.








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

Clue 1: [ The first clue is Stalemate ]

Clue 2: [ The second clue is that two black-squared Bishops are insufficient for White to win the game. ]

1…Ka6 is indeed the right move for diagram 3, but what to do after 2.b8P+

Next lesson will be used to present mate in three exercises.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *