Double attack Forks

In the previous lessons you have learned to attack and to defend, but if your opponent always defends the pieces you are attacking then it will never be possible to capture a piece unless it becomes impossible to defend all attacked pieces or more precisely to defend all attacked targets. The twofold attack is one of the possibilities to accomplish this as we have seen in one of the previous lessons. Another possibility to assure that your opponent is unable to defend all the attacked targets is the double attack. This will be the main focus of this second series of lessons.

double attack is a move that attacks two targets at the same time. If the resulting attacks (of this move) are made by the same piece it is called a fork.

The Knight fork








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

The Knight is Knights probably the piece that is most often used for a fork. It is easy for the Knight to attack two pieces without being attacked at the same time.

 

An example of a Knight fork is given in the diagram at the left.
The King is in check and has to move enabling the Knight to capture the Rook on the next move..
The Queen fork








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

Another piece that is often involved in these double attacks is the Queen. It is often rather easy to find a square from which the Queen attacks two other pieces. Note however that the Queen will probably be more valuable than the attacked pieces that therefor have to be undefended to gain a material advantage.
The pawn fork








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

Even a pawn can attack two pieces at the same time and since in a normal situation the pawn is not as valuable as the attacked pieces it doesn’t matter that the attacked pieces are defended.
For example in the diagram on the left the Rook is defending the Knight and remains a defender after moving the Rook to g5.
The Bishop fork








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

In general the attacked pieces have to be more valuable or have to be undefended for a successful double attack. In addition the attacked pieces should not be able to capture the attacking piece unless this is defended and less valuable. Therefor most of the time a Bishop fork is aimed at a combination of the King, a loose Knight, a Rook and the queen if the bishop is protected.
The Rook fork








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

The double attack with the Rook is rather easy to see but is often overlooked, because it occurs less frequent.The Rook is a very valuable piece, but the number of possibilities for a double attack are the same as with the Bishop.
Another fork








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

The diagram on the left illustrates that there is also another possibility for a fork: A King fork. This is such a rare fork that it is not even mentioned in most chess books.

 

Note that the fork in the diagram isn’t even working when the Rook is on the other side of the Bishop. Then the Rook can move to the right still defending the Bishop.
If you are rather unfamiliar with the material of this lesson it is probably the best to focus on one kind of fork to start with. I suggest to start with the Queen fork followed by the Knight fork.

You may want to continue with the lesson about the different kind of targets of the Queen Fork or the lesson about the Knight fork.

 

twofold attack

In the previous lessons we have learned how to attack and defend pieces. But the other player will also defend the pieces you are attacking. If an exchange doesn’t give you any advantage you may be able to attack the piece once more.

As an example in the diagram on the left white is able to capture the Knight, but then in turn black will capture the Bishop. Therefor it may be better for white to move the Rook to a5, attacking the Bishop by two pieces at the same time. In the diagram at the right white can capture the Knight with the Bishop and black will not capture the Bishop. Why shouldn’t white capture the Knight with the Rook?

 








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







White to move Position after move 1 2 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

Let’s have a look what happens (in the second diagram) if black captures the Bishop that has captured the Knight. These moves result in the following diagram.

 








White to move Position after move 2 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

White will capture the undefended Rook, as you have learned in the take free pieces lesson.
You can see that white has won a Rook and a Knight and black only a Bishop. If black hadn’t recaptured the Bishop the loss would be limited to the Knight.
It is very important to consider the value of the pieces before you start an exchange. And remember that your opponent isn’t obliged to capture, which makes it very important to capture with the attacking (and defending) pieces in the right order.

 








Black to move Position after move 3 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

The final diagram is an endgame of a King with a single Rook against a bare King. This is rather easy to win as we will see in the lesson dedicated to this endgame.

Let’s continue with a lesson about Stalemate.

Chess Rules

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The rules of Chess – The starting position

Chess is a very appealing game that is played by millions of people all around the world.

Chess is a game for two players and is played on an 8×8 checkered board, with a dark square in each player’s lower left corner. White, the player of the light colored pieces, moves first. Then Back has to move a piece. Each player has to move in turn and a move cannot be skipped.








White to move Position after move 0 Castling possibilities: KQkq 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

Each game starts in the position shown in the diagram above in which each player has 1 King, 1 Queen, 2 Rooks, 2 Bishops, 2 Knights and 8 pawns. Please note that in this starting position the Queens are placed on their own color next to the Kings on the center files.

The goal in the chess game is to checkmate the opponent’s King. Checkmate happens if the king is under attack (in check) and no legal move can be made to solve this. When you have checkmated your opponent’s king you have won the game.

More about the (movements of the) chess pieces and the rules of chess can be found in the next lesson.

 

 

The rules of Chess – The Chess Pieces

During this lesson all the moves of the chess pieces are shortly explained.

The King
The King can move one square in any direction. The King can also capture an opponent’s piece if it is on one of those squares as long as this piece is not defended. The King is not allowed to move himself into check. The following figure illustrates how the King moves. The King can move to any of the marked squares.

 








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

Sometimes a special move with the King is allowed which is called castling. This is the only chess move that actually involves two pieces at the same time as we will see at the end of this lesson.

The Rook
The Rook can move any number of squares in a horizontal or vertical straight line, but the Rook may not jump over a piece of either color. The Rook can capture an opponent’s piece by placing the Rook at the same square.
In the castling moves in which two pieces are moved at the same time apart from the King the Rook is involved as we will see at te end of this lesson.
One final remark about the possibility to move a Rook (or any other piece): A move may never result in a placement of the own King in check.

 








White to move

 

The Bishop
The Bishop can move any number of squares diagonally as long as it doesn’t jump over another piece. At the beginning of the game each player has a Bishop on a white square and a Bishop on a black square. Because of their move possibilities these Bishops will always remain on the same color.

 








White to move

 

The Queen
The Queen is the most powerfull piece and combines the powers of both the Rook and the Bishop. It can move horizontally, vertically, or diagonally. However, even the Queen is unable to jump over another piece.
The following diagram gives an overview of these possibilities to move and capture. The white pawn is blocking the path of the Queen. A black pawn on the same place can be captured, but the Queen is still unable to jump over it.

 








White to move

 

The Knight
The Knight’s move is unusual among the chess pieces. It is the only piece that jumps. The move is most of the times described as two squares horizontally and one square vertically, or two squares vertically and one square horizontally. It may be easier to say that the Knight may jump to any of the outer squares with a different color of the 5 by 5 area around the Knight.
Let’s look at the diagram.

 








White to move

 

Please note that both the white as the black pawn, as well as any other piece, doesn’t influence the move possibilities of the Knight, as long as the move doesn’t place the own King in check.

The pawn
The pawns are allowed to only move one square forwards at at time. However, in their first move, they can move two squares if they want. They can only move straight forward and never backwards. And they can only capture one of the enemy pieces diagonally. A pawn that makes it to the other side will be promoted to another piece: a Knight, a Bishop, a Rook or even a Queen! Most of the time the player exchanges his pawn at such a moment for a Queen, but it may be useful to remember that another piece may be choosen.

 








White to move

 

In the diagram above the normal moves are indicated by the cross marks, while the capture moves of the white pawn are indicated by the black dots. However capture is only possible when one of the opponent’s pieces is located at one of these squares.

En passant
As mentioned a pawn is able to move two squares forward when it has not moved before, but there is a special rule to prevent them to pass an opposite pawn.
On the very next move and only the next move, this pawn can be captured on the field that has been skipped.

Chess diagrams illustrating En Passant

On the left diagram the white pawn has just been moved two squares forward as indicated by the red arrow. It has been passing a square that is attacked by the black pawn. At the next move Black takes the pawn by placing his pawn on the square. The situation after this move is shown in the diagram at the right.

Castling
In the next diagram, the white King can castle on either side of the board. To castle, move the King two squares toward the Rook, and then move the Rook to the square immediately on the other side of the King.

 








White to move Position after move 8 Castling possibilities: KQkq 8 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

Castling is only allowed when:

  • The King and castling Rook have never moved during this game
  • The King is not in check at the starting square
  • The King is not in check at the destination square
  • The King is not in check on the squares is passing through
  • All the squares between the Rook and the King are vacant

Please note that in the diagram above Black is not allowed to castle on the King-side. (Look at the white Bishop on c4.)
King-side castling is also called short castling. Queen-side castling is called long castling.

One final rule
One final rule about the moves of the chess pieces. According to the official rules a piece that has been touched has to be moved. A move is completed as soon as the piece has been released and may not been taken back.

The next chess lesson is about the end of the game.

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2 Responses to “The rules of Chess – The Chess Pieces”

  1. I think that u should teach them about the point system in chess while teaching them how to move this way they can comprehend more data about the piece.

  2. The order of the chess lessons is somewhat arbitrary, but I have chosen to start with the lessons about how to play the game. These lessons are followed by the lessons about how to win the game. The value of the pieces is one of the first lessons in the beginner’s course.

 

Rules for the opening

The initial moves of a chess game are called the opening. There are a lot of different openings (with their own names) and we will pay more attention to some of these openings later on.
For now the most important thing to know about the chess opening is a set of general guidelines that can be used for almost all chess openings. In general learning a sequence of moves doesn’t help to understand the game of chess.

  1. Begin the game with a centre pawn.
    • In fact beginners should only consider 1.e4 as their first move.
    • Make only one or two pawn moves in the opening, not more.
  2. Develop the minor pieces so that they influence the centre.
    • Move pieces not pawns.
    • Keep your queen safe.
    • Do not bring your rooks out in the opening.
    • Develop knights before bishops.
    • Move the knights toward the center (and not on the side) of the board.
    • Don’t attack if you haven’t completed your development.
    • Don’t move a piece twice before all pieces are developed unless it is necessary.
  3. Move your king to safety
    • Pay special attention to the vulnerable f2 and f7 squares (before castling)
    • Castle king’s-side or when this seems to be unwise queen’s-side.

The chess lessons continue with the Discovered Attack.

 

The rules of Chess – The end of the game

As we have seen in one of the previous lessons the game is decided with a Checkmate, but not every game ends with a Mate. One of the players often resigns before the actual Mate is being acomplished.

Furthermore if no legal move can be made, but the King is not checked, the game necessarily is at an end. This situation is called Stalemate and the game ends in a Draw.
A draw can also be reached by mutual agreement, when both players assume they are not able to win the game.
It is also a draw when during these fifty successive moves no capture nor the advance of a Pawn has been performed. or if exactly the same position (with the same player to move and the same castling possibilities) occurs three times in the game, the player to move can also claim a draw.

Chess clocks and time
Especially for the more official games the game is often played with chess clocks. These clocks count the time that each player separately takes for making his own moves. The player who has used all his available time also looses the game. Some additional rules especially with respect to these chess clocks but also for some more complex situations can be found in the FIDE handbook.

Now that we know the rules it is time for some tips about winning at chess.

 

Knowing the rules: Some tips

What’s Next?

Knowing all the rulesmoves and starting position isn’t enough to become a good chess player. More chess lessons will follow, but this may be a good moment to emphasize that you also have to move this theory into practice. Nobody can learn to play chess without playing chess games.

Here are some tips especially targeted at junior players.
Most of these tips are based on the fact that in almost all beginner’s games one of the players is able to win pieces because they weren’t protected.

Think before you move and make sure that you don’t leave a piece unprotected, because
– you place the piece on an unprotected attacked square
– or because the piece was protecting another piece that becomes unprotected

Furthermore if a piece is touched you have to move this piece, but you may decide to place it on another square (than originally intended) as long as the piece has not been released.

Think before moving: Is this realy the best move or is it possible to capture an unprotected piece of the opponent?

If you are about to capture a piece: realize that chess isn’t about capturing pieces. Is it possible to capture a more valuable piece or is it possible to checkmate?

You have to be aware of the value of the pieces in order to be able to determine if an exchange is profitable.

If you manage to reach a simple endgame that is known as won, you have to be able to finish it off. You have to be able to win a game with a King and Rook against a bare King, and certainly with a King and Queen against this bare King. Practice this with a friend or with a computer.

In order to make it easier to communicate the concepts of chess I will now continue by learning you the Algebraic chess notation.

Eliminate the Defender

In addition to the twofold attack and the double attack there are more tactic possibilities to capture a piece. Many times you can win a chess piece by first attacking it and then attacking the defending piece. Removing this guard results in leaving the first chess piece unprotected.








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

White can not capture the Knight at f4, because it is defended by the Bishop. This Bishop however can be exchanged for White’s Knight at e4, leaving the Knight at f4 unprotected.

White can capture the Knight after 1.Nxd6 cxd6 with 2.Rxf4.

The defender is eliminated by a capture.








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

The next diagram is rather similar, but now White is unable to capture the defender. Now the defender can be attacked and driven away by 1.c5. After 1…Be7 the Knight can be captured.

It is more likely that after 1.c5 Black captures the pawn with 1…Bxc5 after which White will capture the Bishop with 2.bxc5.








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

A third way to eliminate the defender is by interference.
In this third diagram White is able to place a piece between the guard and the guardian by means of 1.d4.
After something like 1…Ra3 White can capture the Knight by 2.Rxe3.

At first sight it looks as if Black will capture Black’s Bishop on the next move, but this is not allowed because 2…Rxb3 meets 3.Re8#.








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

The previous diagrams showed some examples of ways to remove the guard.

In the diagram on the left it is rather easy to remove the guard, because the guard is defending two pieces at the same time.
The Queen at e7 is both defending the Knight at f6 as the Bishop at a3.
After 1.Bxf6 Qxf6 White can capture the Bishop: 2.Rxa3.

In the last example the Queen is not driven away, but attracted to f6. This possibility to remove the guard is called distracting, resulting in a move to another square.

In this lesson 4 possibilities to eliminate the defender have been shown:

  • Capturing
  • Attacking
  • Interference
  • Distracting

Next chess lesson: The Pin.

 

 

5 Responses to “Eliminate the Defender”

  1. I think there’s a typo in the last example, i.e., “1.Bxe6″ should be “1.Bxf6″

    Enjoying the site. Thanks for all your effort!

  2. @Pestilus
    You are right. Thanks for letting me know.
    Now I have corrected it.

  3. Hi

    I think in the last example queen is attracted to f6 not e6 .

  4. @Hadi

    Of course you are right. I have corrected it.

Capture Exercises 2

As I have mentioned in the lesson about taking free pieces almost all chess games are won by first obtaining a material advantage.

Lake

I have added some capture exercises to this site. They are intended for the beginning chess player, but it is assumed that this chess player knows how the pieces move and also knows about the value of these pieces.
The exercises can be seen as a follow-up on this last one and the lesson about taking free pieces.

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2 Responses to “Capture exercises”

  1. There’s a flaw with #12… but thanks for the exercises I appreciate them.

  2. @mike
    I think it’s not a flaw, but the exercise is more difficult than the other exercises in this series.
    In #12 you may think that you can play Bxg6, but after … Rc6 the position is about equal.
    Do you still think it’s a flaw?

The Value of The Pieces

It is essential for chess players to know the relative value of the chess pieces in order to judge a trade of pieces.

The most commonly used values are:

  • 1 : Pawn
  • 3 : Knight
  • 3 : Bishop
  • 5 : Rook
  • 9 : Queen

These values are based on their strength in endgames and should be handled with care. Before starting a trade the expected outcome of the resulting endgame has to be checked. A pawn may be sufficient to win the game, but two Knights are probably not enough.
In addition the Bishop is more powerful than the Knight, especially in conjunction with the other Bishop.
Trading pieces based on these values without thinking about the final result may lead to the following position (in which it is Black’s turn to move).

 








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

Continue reading with a chess lesson about Defending or do you still have to do some capture exercises?

Take Free Pieces

In almost all chess games one of the players wins by first obtaining a material advantage. The easiest way to obtain such a material advantage is to take the free pieces offered by the other player.

One way to localize these pieces is to look at each of your own pieces to see whether one of them can take the piece that just moved. Another way to localize these pieces is by starting from this piece itself and look on the same line or file for rooks and queens, on the same diagonals for Bishops, etcetera.
Not all potential free pieces are to be found this way, but it is a good start for a beginning chess player. For a more experienced player it is also needed to look at the opponent’s pieces that were defended by the moved piece at its previous position.

Later on it will become more important to assure that the found potential free pieces are really free.

Some exercises








White to move Position after move 13 5 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







White to move Position after move 9 Castling possibilities: KQkq 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







White to move Position after move 32 3 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







Black to move Position after move 19 3 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

In the last exercise it is Black’s turn to move and the piece isn’t for free. But, does this matter?

By now it is time that we learn about the value of the pieces.

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One Response to “Take free pieces”

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  1. Capture exercises on Chess Teaching

Defending

Now that you know how to move the pieces and to capture the free pieces your opponent is offering it is time to spend some time on a lesson about how to deal with an attacked piece.

If one of your pieces is attacked you have to know how the piece can be defended. There are at least 4 possible ways to escape capture:

  1. Capture (the attacking piece)
  2. Evade (Move away the attacked piece)
  3. Defend (If your opponent captures the piece you can recapture his piece)
  4. Block (Place another piece or pawn between the two pieces)


Capture
In both of the diagrams below the black Bishop on d6 is attacking the white Bishop on b4 and in both cases white is able to capture the black Bishop, but in the second diagram black is able to recapture white’s Bishop with his Rook. In fact this second diagram is a rather complex situation in which white has a lot of possibilities to escape capture.

 








White to move
Position after move 0
0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







White to move
Position after move 0
0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

Evade
It is also possible to evade the pieces which is probably the best thing to do in the next two diagrams.

 








Black to move
Position after move 1
0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







White to move
Position after move 0
0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

Defend
The following diagrams are used to illustrate the possibility to defend a piece. In the first diagram the attacked black Bishop can be defended by moving the Rook to a7. In the second diagram the white Bishop can be defended by moving the Knight to f1. It is important to know the value of the pieces when you defend or exchange pieces.

 








Black to move
Position after move 1
0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







White to move
Position after move 0
0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

Block
The fourth possibility to defend a piece is by placing another piece or pawn between the attacker and the attacked piece. In the first diagram the black Queen is attacked and it is not allowed to move the Queen on another file, because the King will be in check. It is possible to defend the Queen by moving the King to b7, but this will result in an exchange of the Queen for a Rook. The best move is placing the Bishop from e8 to b5.
In the second diagram the Queen is attacked by the Bishop on g5. In this diagram more blocking opportunities exist, but the most often played move is Be7.

 








Black to move
Position after move 1
0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







Black to move
Position after move 4
Castling possibilities: KQkq
3 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

More ways to defend
There are more ways to defend a piece against being captured, but these will be part of future lessons. To give you one clue: by looking at the second diagram in the capture section, you may notice that moving the Rook to d1 is probably a better move.

 

After this lesson on defending we are going to attack twice as hard with the lesson on the twofold attack.

Stalemate

If the player whose turn it is has no legal moves the game has to end. If this player is not in check it is called stalemate. Stalemate ends the game and the result is a draw, even when one of the players has a big material advantage.
The following two diagrams are stalemates.

 








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

So you have to be very careful and avoid the stalemates especially when you are a Queen ahead. The next two diagrams do not represent stalemates.
Do you see why?

 








Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture







Black to move Position after move 1 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

 

The black King has no legal moves, but black still has legal moves. He has to move his pawn. After the pawn move it is white’s turn. And both diagrams result in a mate in one problem.
Can you solve it?

For the first diagram there are four solutions and the fact that black’s pawn may have been promoted to a Queen (or another piece) doesn’t matter.

The next lessons tries to explain why chess lessons start at the end. A complete overview of all chess lessons can be found in the index of chess lessons.

Checkmating with the Queen

 








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

The Queen is a very powerful piece, but even this powerful white piece is not able to checkmate the black king by itself. The white king is needed to support the queen. This kind of endgame is very common when a player has managed to promote a pawn. Attention has to be paid to avoid a stalemate and the mate must be reached within 50 moves as it is a draw if 50 consecutive moves occur without a capture or pawn move.








Black to move Position after move 1 1 half-move after last pawn advance or capture

Theoretically the maximum number of moves that is needed to checkmate is 10 which corresponds to the position of the upper board on the left side. First the black king is imprisoned as shown in the second diagram by 1.Qe5

 

Then the king has to come to assist the queen:
1…Kd3 2.Kg7 Kc4 3.Kf6 Kd3 4.Kf5 Kc4 5.Ke4 Kb3








Black to move Position after move 6 11 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

And the prison is made smaller: 6.Qc5 Ka4

 

If Black plays 6…Kb2 the reply is 7.Kd3.

A smaller prison by 7.Qb6 and again the white king has to approach:
…Ka3 8.Kd3 Ka2 9.Kc3 Ka3








Black to move Position after move 10 19 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

After 9…Ka1 white mates with 10.Qb2#
but now it is: 10.Qb3#

 

It is a good exercise trying to visualize all the checkmating patterns with the queen and king.

Are you already able to checkmate with the rook?
Do you like to have an overview of all beginner’s chess lessons?

How To Checkmate With King and Rook

 








White to move Position after move 0 0 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

This lesson describes a rather easy method to perform a checkmate with a single Rook.

 

The black King is in the centre of the board and White must force him to the side of the board. This will be done by cutting off some of the King’s escape squares with the Rook. Since the black King is on the right side the rook starts from the left side by 1.Td1 (Diagram 2)








Black to move Position after move 1 1 half-move after last pawn advance or capture

Black tries to keep his King in the centre but White is also moving the King to the centre.

 

1…Ke4 2.Kc3

The white King will always go for the line just outside the Rook’s rectangle. The black King can not play 2…Ke3 because of 3.Re1. He has to avoid the opposition.








Black to move Position after move 7 13 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

2…Ke5 3.Kc4 Ke6 4.Kc5 Ke7 5.Kc6 Ke8 6.Kc7

 

In fact 6.Rd7 is better, but in this lesson one line at the time is taken away from the black King.
Now the black King has reached the end of the board. He has to move to the right or in opposition with the white King.

6…Ke7 7.Re1+ (Diagram 3)

And now the black King has to move to the right.

7… Kf6 8.Kd6 Kf5 9.Re8 Kf4

The Rook likes to be on a rank that is nearer to his own King. This makes it easier to follow the black King.

 








Black to move Position after move 14 27 half-moves after last pawn advance or capture

And now to take away the next line:

 

9…Kf4 10.Kd5 Kf3 11.Kd4 Kf2 12.Kd3 Kf1 13.Kd2 Kf2 Rf8+
(Diagram 4)

14…Kg3 15.Ke3 Kg4

Again moving the Rook to the other side:

16.Rf1 Kg3

Not Black’s best move, but let’s see what happens if Black tries to capture the white Rook.

17.Rg1+ Kh2

Nothing happens. White just has to move the Rook to the other side.

18.Rg8 Kh1 19.Kf2 Kh2 20.Rh8# 1-0

Now black’s King has no lines left at all.
This is a rather easy way to accomplish the checkmate, but it takes some time. On the other hand it certainly takes less than 50 moves.

Have you already learned the checkmating with the Queen or do you prefer to start with the first lesson at intermediate level: Piece activity?